On Book Remainders, Origami and Connectivity

18 09 2016

Regular visitors to these pages will know that I often remark on the connectedness of things. Of course, if you live a relatively normal life, interacting with others, reading a little, observing the world as you pass through it – and to some degree, it passes through you – you will almost inevitably notice (or at least perceive) connections. Those moments of déjà vu  when you think you’ve seen something before, or see some connection with something you saw elsewhere.

A few months ago, I was partaking in one of my personal vices… perusing the shelves of Chapters’ Book Shop in Surrey. I have sufficiently eclectic tastes that I often find books that interest me in the discount/remainder section, and this time was particularly fruitful. I discovered a book called On Paper, by Nicholas A. Basbanes. It is a personal account of the author’s discovery of the history of all things “paper”. It’s invention, its development and of course its uses. One chapter that really caught my imagination was about the real gurus of origami and one man in particular – Robert Lang. He is renowned for making a full scale replica of a cuckoo clock out of a single 1’x10′ sheet of paper.

Robert Lang: Black Forest Cuckoo Clock, Opus 182

Robert Lang: Black Forest Cuckoo Clock, Opus 182

His origami skills are put to use figuring out how to fold up a space-borne telescope for putting on a probe that had to be squeezed into the top of a rocket then unfolded in the vacuum of space. Despite his stellar (sorry…) folding skills, he’s a scientist for a day job. In amongst all his achievements I read that he’d created a pteranodon with a 16′ wingspan that was installed at the Redpath Museum in McGill University… where my daughter is a student. Though she’d visited the museum she had not seen the installation. Seems hard to believe given the size, but then again… many people don’t take the opportunity to look up!

Anyway, she is an archaeology and anthropology student and recently took a volunteer position at Redpath, helping the great unwashed understand what they’re looking at. Being based on the balcony level, she really couldn’t miss the gigantic piece and took a couple of photos for me. I don’t know why, but this somehow brought closure to the open file in my mind, created when I first read of his amazing design skills.

Redpath: Robert J. Lang's Pteranodon

Redpath Museum: Robert J. Lang’s Pteranodon

 

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Redpath Museum: Robert J. Lang’s Pteranodon