Autumn’s here folks!

27 10 2016

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That time of year again

12 10 2015

I love autumn. Especially here in BC. The damp seems to refresh the land and me along with it. Walking through the trails is suddenly full of things to see, smell and hear. But less people. Sunday, me and the devil-dog went on a bit of a traipse through the woods to build up an appetite for the half-pig that was to help us celebrate Canadian Thanksgiving, and were rewarded with lots of mushroom sightings and the real high-point: a Barred Owl swooping right in front of us to traverse the narrow ravine we were walking in. Huge and magnificent in its majesty. Naturally I snapped a few shots with my trusty phone, though was too slow to capture the owl’s image…

 





Reflecting on the colours of Autumn

3 10 2015
Autumn Colours

Autumn Colours





Photos from today’s dog walk

20 09 2015

At the weekend I like to try and give the dog a bit more of a long walk. It’s good for the pair of us.

The weather has changed distinctly autumnal recently and though the temperatures are still on the balmy side, it’s a lot wetter and today – windier. I absolutely adore this time of year. The winds make everything fresh and somehow renewed. The dead leaves and twigs are stripped from the trees. Sometimes a whole tree at a time! And I love walking in the rain. When I’m suitably attired of course!

Anyway, I had my phone camera with me so I snapped a few impressions as we walked around.

Bark Detail

Bark Detail

No idea what kind of trees these were, but the layered effect of the bark made them almost look like relief models of some strange planet. Note the small growths of lichen.

The way we came

The way we came

I really enjoy the way Surrey’s parks use natural materials so they become part of the landscape.

Footstep Fungus

Footstep Fungus

The long dry summer and now wet autumn has really boosted the various fruiting bodies of the local fungi. This one was evident in the cracks of three or four steps.

Alpha and Omega

Alpha and Omega

I thought it poignant that here in one place were the very beginnings of a tree – a seed, and also the very end – machined planks made into a handrail.

Ermy-germy

Ermy-germy

On the way back out of the forest I suddenly became aware that every couple of metres there was one or more of these metallic copper beetles. They were quite large. I can only think the dry summer had squeezed their activity into the short period remaining until winter hits.





Vancouver Maple Leaves

19 09 2015

No, this isn’t some great upset in the NHL franchise. Nor is it a sudden realisation by Toronto that their Ice Hockey team has been spelling its name incorrectly for decades. It’s simply a posting about maple leaves. From Vancouver.

About four years ago I suddenly had my eyes opened. I started to notice little things that had previously just passed me by un-remarked. Beautiful things. Interesting things. Remarkable things. Amongst this long list was maple leaves. Around this time of year, or actually a little later, the local trees start shedding their leaves. The maples – up until now pretty anonymous and blending in with the rest of the biosphere – suddenly decide to get all showy, turn bright vermilion and yell “look at me, peasants!” The glory of the red in the trees (and shortly thereafter – the pavement) can literally be breathtaking.

This year our BC summer was particularly long and hot. So much so that many trees went into shock and started behaving like autumn was already here. It was apparently more prudent to shut up shop early for the winter rather than try to continue actively growing in the face of a complete absence of the usually plentiful wet coast airborne moisture. So – we started to get beautiful red maple leaves falling in ever growing numbers even in what should really still be late summer. Without the accompaniment of the autumn wetness though, many of these leaves remained pristine after falling to the ground. Every year I take note of the fallen leaves and occasionally am moved to pause and pick one up. I couldn’t really explain why to you. Something about a specific leaf simply moves me to stoop and save it from a fate worse than compost. With the dry ground, there have been more occasions than usual this year.

I began to consider these leaves as a metaphor for people. We each have the potential to be wonderful, eye-catching. Either individually or as part of a broader group. We can still create an impact in the world even after we’ve ceased to live. We can continue to contribute to our world by leaving a legacy of beauty. Of positive psychological impact on others around us. Then again, even the most beautiful amongst us – if we care to look more closely – is imperfect. A slight asymmetry perhaps. A little rougher on the edges than we’d first perceived. Sometimes completely broken on the inside despite the appearance of complete wholesomeness to the casual glance. We can be downtrodden, utterly destroyed by the casual or indeed intimate passing interaction of another. We can be ignored and slowly disappear into the noise of the world, never to be recognised for our individual contribution – great though it may well have been.

So now I take notice. I LOOK at the fallen leaves. Notice them. Especially the maples. They have come to represent for me the unknown people of the world. Those I’ll never meet but have a contribution to make to the space I inhabit. Occasionally I am so moved that I pause and pick one up. I press it in the pages of the book I am inevitably carrying at such thoughtful moments. I save it. For what, I am not sure. To share? To offer as a cryptic gift to someone else on this weird journey we call life? Perhaps. Or perhaps just to say in some small way “you mattered”. You were noticed. Your contribution did not go without reaction.

Vancouver Maple Leaves

Vancouver Maple Leaves





Quite the display

12 09 2015

Had an excruciating meeting at the bank this morning, so went of to Timmie’s for a coffee afterwards and walked back home through the Semiahmoo Shopping Centre. I had quite  a pleasant surprise because of all the beautiful flowers on display at the old Zeller’s Court in there. Turns out today was the annual White Rock Garden Fall Floral Show.

The White Rock Garden Club holds a judged show where members present their best assortment of flowers and 26 different dahlias. Some of them were stunning. It was a shame to see the flower stems cut and in water. They’re already dead… they just don’t realise it yet.

Golden star

Golden star

Tickled Pink

Tickled Pink

Stink Eye

Stink Eye

Gorgeous peach hue

Gorgeous peach hue

Pretty in Pink

Pretty in Pink

Study in Green

Study in Green





Spitting Image

7 09 2015

Today Mrs E and I went for a trip up the road to Squamish. It’s a town that defines itself by the number of outdoor activities enjoyed there by the great unwashed of Vancouver. (I’ve smelt some of them… it’s not always a metaphor). We went for a bit of an amble right to the end of “Spit Road” which is basically just an unmade road going due South along the various low-lying islands and marshy bits between The Squamish River and the inlet into Squamish itself. Because of the wind being channelled up the Sound this is a hugely popular place for kite-surfers and wind-surfers. I’ve seen them many times from the top of The Chief, but it was interesting to reverse the view and see them up close, as well as The Chief in toto, instead as a vignette sweeping by from the car on the close-by Highway 99.