Won Park – The Master of Origami Paper Folding | The Design Inspiration

18 02 2012

So someone sent me one of those email chain letter thingies, but it turned out the guy referred to (Won Park) is real. Check out this site for some examples of his work folding a US $1 bill

Won Park – The Master of Origami Paper Folding | The Design Inspiration.

Won Park – The Master of Origami Paper Folding | The Design Inspiration





Nomophobia

18 02 2012

Yup – there’s actually a word for the fear of losing your mobile phone!! I’ve certainly seen the fear displayed – the sudden panic stricken look on a previously calm face; the manic delving into more pockets than any coat should have had in the first place; the return of calm to the face once it is located again (in the first pocket that had been examined… but not too well). Read the article about it from The Vancouver Sun:

Nomophobia — the fear of losing one’s phone — on the rise: survey.

VancouverSun: There’s a name for the overwhelming fear of losing your mobile phone and with it contact with friends and family — nomophobia — and the findings of a recent survey suggests it’s on the rise.  Read more: http://www.canada.com/Nomophobia+fear+losing+phone+rise+survey/6171812/story.html#ixzz1mmV22Zu1

VancouverSun: There’s a name for the overwhelming fear of losing your mobile phone and with it contact with friends and family — nomophobia — and the findings of a recent survey suggests it’s on the rise.





Love You So What?

18 02 2012

It’s a wet weekend in White Wock. Nothing unusual there then! This is after all BC. In the middle of a bloody temperate rain forest for Pete’s sake!

But today, I find myself a little melancholy. Time for some Lloyd Cole then. Bad Vibes album, I think.

I have always admired “Love you so what” because of the classic line “Paris in the Spring doesn’t mean a damn thing to my baby“. It has haunted me since the very first time I ever heard it.

I’ve been to Paris many times. I’ve loved it. I’ve hated it. But it’s always meant something!

Here’s a clip from iTunes… where you can buy the track or the whole album: Love You So What

LloydCole.com: Columbia Hotel 1984 by Joe Shutter

LloydCole.com: Columbia Hotel 1984 by Joe Shutter

Love You So What

Lloyd Cole

You up and leave me cold turkey
When you know I could not tie my own shoe
This does not please me, no not exactly
Guess you do not give a damn for my love

Everybody knows that she’s worse than religion
No you do not cross a woman in love
Everybody knows that the turn of the season
Paris in the spring doesn’t mean a damn thing to my baby
No, no no, no

You beat me up, you put me down
You’re slamming my name all over town
Guess I’m big enough to roll with the punches
But you bruise me, you abuse me damn good

Everybody knows that she’s worse than religion
No you do not cross a woman in love
Everybody knows that the turn of the season
Paris in the spring doesn’t do a damn thing

I love you so, so much
You love me so, so what
I love you so, so
You love me so, so what

La la la la la, la la la la
La la la la la, la la la la
La la la la la, la la la la
La la la la la, la la la la la





Average Social Gamer Is a 43-Year-Old Woman

18 02 2012

Puts a whole new slant on the concept of “bored housewife”! Probably a side-effect of the decline in milk being delivered to the doorstep, and fewer window cleaners these days.

Gigaom

Rightly or wrongly, many people have a picture in their minds of the average online gamer, and it probably involves someone not yet old enough to vote, huddled in their parents’ basement killing dwarves with mystic powers in games like World of Warcraft. A growing category of what are called “social games,” however, appeals to a much different demographic, according to a recent study. The study — sponsored by PopCap, creator of popular social games such as Bejeweled and Insaniquarium — looked at game players in both the United States and the United Kingdom, and found that the average player of these online social games is a 43-year-old woman.

More than 24 percent of those who responded to the survey (full results in PDF form here) said they regularly play social games, a category that includes Facebook games such as Farmville, Mafia Wars and Happy Aquarium. According to…

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Gunbarrel Coffee anyone?

17 02 2012

Not sure I know what it is… but I think I want one next time I’m in Big White!!

Flickr: Gunbarrel Coffee

Flickr: Gunbarrel Coffee

Flickr: Gunbarrel Coffee

Flickr: Gunbarrel Coffee

Whole hot article here: FIELD TRIP #591: Lighting Double-Barrelled Drinks On Fire In The Snow Up At Big White





Want one!

16 02 2012

Seen around Vancouver/White Rock recently…

Aston Martin: Vancouver

Aston Martin: Vancouver

Lotus: White Rock/South Surrey

Lotus: White Rock/South Surrey





Not the Quieter Elephant

16 02 2012

So I’ve had to explain to more than one person the rather lame aural joke that is “Quieter Elephant”, despite the pretty explicit tagline of this blog.

It reminded me of a “song” in an old episode of the UK’s “Not the 9 O’Clock News“, which used to air on BBC2, while (you guessed it) “The 9 O’Clock News” aired on BBC1.

Here’s a rather young-looking (1982) Rowan Atkinson (Mr Bean as he later deteriorated into), and Mel Smith (who some may recognise as the albino in Princess Bride when he was short of money) with Pamela Stephenson  and Griff Rhys Jones singing “Kinda Lingers”. And if you don’t get that joke, I ain’t explaining it…





Imagine that!

16 02 2012

I like clever things. Especially if they’re curvy too!

So there I was reading ThoughtsOnTheatre when I saw this amazing digitally enhanced image:

ThoughtsOnTheatre: Taking Control of Your Own Path

ThoughtsOnTheatre: Taking Control of Your Own Path

Finding myself a bit curious (no comments thank-you), I tracked it down to possibly my new favourite website: dornob! With a tagline of “design ideas daily”, it’s a visual feast of all things creative. Some of the items are amazing images in themselves, such as the grassy flip-flops:

dornob: Grass Sandals? Front-Yard Flip Flops Take Gardens to Go

dornob: Grass Sandals? Front-Yard Flip Flops Take Gardens to Go

Then there’s the slightly more macabre heart-shaped water/wine carafes:

dornob: Heart-Shaped Carafe & Decanter Set is Somewhat Creepy

dornob: Heart-Shaped Carafe & Decanter Set is Somewhat Creepy

When it comes to sensuous curves though, you’d be hard pushed to beat this gorgeous sink design:

dornob: Complex Curves: Beautifully Smooth Basin Designs

dornob: Complex Curves: Beautifully Smooth Basin Designs

But I think you’d have to go a long way to beat this bathroom sink for just plain oddity:

dornob:  Bathroom Waterfall Wall Sinks Show Off Daily Use & Flow

dornob: Bathroom Waterfall Wall Sinks Show Off Daily Use & Flow

The design is intended to emphasise the water usage and theoretically reduce waste.

Probably not a great choice for families with young boys though.

Just sayin’…





Tolochinov’s dog

15 02 2012

OK, so Ivan Filippovitch Tolochinov was the assistant of  Ива́н Петро́вич Па́влов (Russian not up to it? Try “Ivan Petrovich Pavlov“), and together in 1901 they cooked up the little theory since known as “conditioned reflex“.

No – this isn’t a Duran Duran song. Stay focused!

In a nutshell, this is the concept that one can come to expect an event to occur after some prior signal, if that association is repeated often enough to build the assumed sequence. An amusing early reference to this is in  The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1759) by Laurence Sterne.

I quote from Wikipedia:

The narrator Tristram Shandy explains how his mother was conditioned by his father’s habit of winding up a clock before having sex with his wife:

My father […] was, I believe, one of the most regular men in every thing he did […] [H]e had made it a rule for many years of his life,—on the first Sunday-night of every month throughout the whole year,—as certain as ever the Sunday-night came,—to wind up a large house-clock, which we had standing on the back-stairs head, with his own hands:—And being somewhere between fifty and sixty years of age at the time I have been speaking of,—he had likewise gradually brought some other little family concernments to the same period, in order, as he would often say to my uncle Toby, to get them all out of the way at one time, and be no more plagued and pestered with them the rest of the month. […] [F]rom an unhappy association of ideas, which have no connection in nature, it so fell out at length, that my poor mother could never hear the said clock wound up,—but the thoughts of some other things unavoidably popped into her head—& vice versa:—Which strange combination of ideas, the sagacious Locke, who certainly understood the nature of these things better than most men, affirms to have produced more wry actions than all other sources of prejudice whatsoever.

If you’re not into reading more shall we say “learned” books, there was a pretty dodgy film version made with Steve Coogan which also has the scene.

So anyway, Pavlov surgically altered dogs to catch their saliva and prove that by conditioning them to associate various things like electric shocks, whistles, metronomes, tuning forks, and a range of visual stimuli, in addition to ringing a bell (the only one we remember!), with the arrival of food, he could get them to salivate at will.

Wikipedia: One of Pavlov's dogs

Wikipedia: One of Pavlov's dogs

 

Pretty smart stuff really, though I also read on Wikipedia that he did similar experiments on children too, including the surgical procedure to collect saliva.

It might just be me, but I have a vision of him sat writing his greatest works, subsequently read and edited by his co-author, while sitting in a puddle of damp dribble!





OK – who pulled the plug out?

15 02 2012

Today, they’d drained one of our local duck ponds.

The ducks (and the resident heron) seemed most confused, vying for space in the last few dribbles between banks of mud.

Drained duck pond

Drained duck pond