Johan Thörnqvist » Pictures from my phone

7 02 2013

I happened upon these lovely, whimsical drawings – additions to otherwise quite ordinary every day phone photos. Johan Thörnqvist includes the original photo along with his modified version. Quite reminiscent of Hergé‘s Tintin, I thought.

Snarlik.se – Johan Thörnqvist » Pictures from my phone.





Basket weaving at a whole new level…

18 01 2013

wicker-covered car by ojo obaniyi.

Not a lot more to say really!!

Artist Ojo Obaniyi from Nigeria uses his pickup to advertise his amazing weaving skills to everyone he passes.





Incredible Trampled Snow Art by Simon Beck | Bored Panda

27 12 2012

Bored Panda do it again! Great find on their excellent design blog. British engineer Simon Beck now spends his winters in Les Arcs, in France. There, he gets his exercise by donning snow shoes and treading out geometric designs he’s created on his computer.

I love this kind of because I can stuff. It’s inherently temporary, in that snow melts and can be covered over, or skied through. But it is such a commitment of time and energy… all an expression of internal drive and, I suppose, love of what you’re trying to achieve. When it’s done, if it ever truly is, then it has a limited time to be appreciated before it gets altered by the wind, or more snow, or other people.

There’s something intensely human about setting out on such a grand task with no real guarantee of success or lasting result. A little like love itself.

Incredible Trampled Snow Art by Simon Beck | Bored Panda.





Dancing Colors: Making Sound Waves Visible by Fabian Oefner | Bored Panda

2 12 2012

I thought these images by Fabian Oefner were extraordinary.

There’s also photos showing the studio setup used. Something you could try at home… and then blame the kids for all the mess! :)

Dancing Colors: Making Sound Waves Visible by Fabian Oefner | Bored Panda.





Patricia Piccinini

2 12 2012

I’ve been thinking about “social networking” recently. I went to a marketing seminar on Tuesday, and that was much of the focus. But it bothers me. The more social media we use, it seems the less truly social we become.

We share inane minutiae about ourselves on Twitter, Facebook (or Twitbook as I once heard them collectively called) to a world that couldn’t care less. Because we can, we do. Yawn. But I think it’s worse than just irrelevant. I actually think it’s negative.

A relationship, be it romantic or friendship (or both, or somewhere in the middle, or neither, or…), waxes and wanes over its lifespan. It gets little pulses of renewal when some new facet is uncovered. “I never knew you had six toes!” It’s not that these little things are secrets per se – they just weren’t worthy of explicit mention. When they do pop up in a conversation, they’re surprising and renewing to the bond that was formed. You realise then that no matter how well you thought you knew the person, there’s an infinite number of layers and facets within them. They’re interesting.

Real people are fascinating.

Online people – less so.

It’s a manufactured persona. A marketing effort. Usually we ourselves are the marketing department and typically suck at it, but “celebrities” really do have other people paid to manage their online “social” persona. I am under no illusions whatsoever that Obama is REALLY checking his LinkedIn connection to humble ol’ Quieter Elephant… especially as I can’t vote in the US! Lloyd Cole on the other hand is (and I say this respectfully) past his creative prime, and I’m a little more confident that he himself creates the tweets I read from @Lloyd_Cole. Especially as he is looking to fund his next album through pre-orders.

So, having said all that – it’s not without its uses either. As with a hammer – it’s a tool that can’t be used for solving every problem, but it does have a place when used appropriately. A big one for me is learning. We never stop learning. If we do – we die. Maybe not physically, but practically. Young people think old people are worthless because they find it harder to learn and adapt. Kids, eh? I think “getting old” is just another way of saying “full!”. The elderly have learned so much in their lives. The young could benefit from tapping into that hard won knowledge and experience. Then the old could learn how to mentor. Win-win!

So I enjoy the opportunities the interwebs (as Bunbury would call them) offer to access new-to-me ideas, opinions and stuff generally. I enjoy StumbleUpon because of its randomness within the scope of my selected interests. (Though “Babes” does seem to come up more often than most. Just sayin’…)

And this very morning my computer, via software written after I arrogantly left the profession claiming “there are no new interesting problems to solve”, delivered to me the work of Patricia Piccinini.

Wikipedia: The Young Family; Patricia Piccinini

Wikipedia: The Young Family; Patricia Piccinini

Born in Sierra Leone, she’s an Australian artist, specialising in “hyper-realistic” sculptures. Typically fibre-glass, silicone, human hair, real clothes. Though her work is varied, a common theme is “what if?” Particularly that emotional space where we question what it is to be human.

I encourage you to check out her website. There’s some amazing work. Thought-provoking as well as technically brilliant. I suspect some readers will be repulsed, others fascinated.

 





Lorenzo Duran and BAFTA awards

24 11 2012

Years ago I used to live in the UK and was an annual member of the National Trust. As a subscriber I got to visit all manner of Manor Houses (sorry – couldn’t help myself). Amongst them was Snowshill Manor – about which I wrote in an earlier post. (If you’re interested, I’ll leave that as an exercise in googling.)

One of the bewildering collections there was a small group of scrimshaw carvings by sailors and Napoleonic prisoners. In bone and ivory. Also some very fine oriental cricket cages. All were examples of very fine handiwork.

Good ol’ StumbleUpon led me to this page today. A similar level of detail… but on leaves!!

Lorenzo Duran – Designaside.com (It’s in Italian, but most browsers will translate it for you if you feel the need).

On a very tenuously connected thread…

When I was a Scout Leader in the UK, one of my young charges went by the name of Diarmid Scrimshaw. Still does actually – why change such a great name? It’s pronounced “Dermott” BTW, in case you were wondering. (I won’t share here what his rather cruel nickname at the time was – boys will be boys!) He was a bit smarter than the average, and I took a shine to him because he was a little bit out of phase with the rather bland world around him in Stony Stratford.

He used to ride a unicycle, just as a random example. To and from Scout meetings. While juggling live cats and chainsaws. OK, not actually, but the unicycle was real enough. I vaguely recall he was a dab hand with cards tricks too, and even more vaguely recall fire eating, but that might just be a false memory. A born performer, nevertheless.

I once bumped into him in a bar at the local cinema complex (he was still very much under drinking age) and he was dressed something like the Blues Brothers. It turned out he was there to play trombone with a band going by the name of The Blues Collective. I have a CD of their’s… not bad at all (“Hot Hits – Volume 1″… not at all pretentious!). Not unlike the sound of the band in The Commitments actually. Plainly this young man would go far. Here’s the opening track “Syrup” about a French prostitute.

Turns out he did go far after all. He just won a BAFTA award as the producer of “The Tyrannosaur“!! Read his interview here.

He just went up even further in my esteem as I learn on IMDB that he produced the Arctic Monkeys at the Apollo!

Diarmid Scrimshaw: now appearing on TWO wheels!

Diarmid on the right with Paddy Considine





BACK TO THE FUTURE : Irina Werning

6 11 2012

Cameras are amazing bits of technology. Digital cameras even more so. But it’s what you choose to do with them that makes the difference between “a snap” and something more interesting.

Irina Werning is fascinated by those “ordinary” photos many of us have around our homes, and by recreating them 10s of years later brings a new dimension – moving them from “snap” to “statement”.

Enjoy: BACK TO THE FUTURE : Irina Werning.








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